Blue51 Show and Tell: Celebrating a Diamond Anniversary

celebrating a diamond anniversary

When a marriage reaches ten years, traditionally diamonds are used to mark the occasion. What happens when a business reaches ten years, particularly in an incredibly tumultuous economic environment? A year long celebration!

Today’s Blue51 Show and Tell gives an insight into providing a communications advising package to a business celebrating a massive achievement.

The project:

Communications Advising with Australia’s most loved preschool ballet program, Kinderballet.

The client:

Kinderballet is a family-owned and operated business celebrating it’s 10th anniversary of operating, and operating successfully- which is particularly remarkable given the current decline in the economy. It is an educational program, grounded in theory and respected by the dance industry.

The client’s target audience:

Kinderballet’s audience is primarily parents and carers of preschool aged children seeking ballet classes for their little ones. A secondary audience is dance schools wishing to introduce Kinderballet classes within their facility.

The approach:

Kinderballet is an incredibly successful business with extensive PR and communications opportunities.  The business has extensive testimonials, a well-established brand and an extensive database of potential, current and former clients. However, the business has operated without an overarching communications plan, and have had a somewhat scattergun approach to communications. Pair this with the ten year anniversary, and it was high time for a communications overhaul.

I worked with KInderballet over a series of communications advising sessions to create a comprehensive communications plan to celebrate the ten year anniversary of the business and to support the roll out of some umbrella services and features. We met regularly to bounce ideas for maximising the communications potential of the celebrations, including updating the website, shifting the social media focus to celebrate Kinderballet’s key points of difference and outlined a raft of additional PR opportunities including media relations, email campaigns to former, existing and potential families, with a thank you for former and existing for being part of the journey, and an invitation to come along to classes in our anniversary year for the prospective and former where appropriate.

The results:

This project- supporting a client like Kinderballet- to maximise their communications potential from a massive milestone- has been a dream, mostly because I absolutely love working with clients like Peter and Sheryn who are so passionate about their business and their industry, who know their stuff, and who aren’t afraid to share it. Honestly, they already knew what they were doing; I was there to provide some guidance, a fresh perspective, some practical support and a set of deadlines!

Tell me, do you ever feel stuck in your business communications? Please get in touch– I’d love to help out.

This is a post in my blog series  about Blue51 Show and Tell. Each month, I share some of the projects I’m working on for my fabulous clients. I can’t wait to show you both the work we’re producing, as well as the amazing results they’re achieving in their businesses. 

There’s more unabashed bragging on my Facebook and Instagram feeds. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help.

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On Point Writing Habits

writing habits for business

As someone who writes for both business and for fun, I’ve learnt a few tricks and tips when it comes to establishing good writing habits, habits that turn musings and scribbles on post its into strong communications.

Here’s some strategies and habits to adopt to improve your writing:

Read like a mofo:

Apologies if you were expecting something more eloquent (have we met?) but writers read. They read voraciously across genres and devour language. As you read, collect words and turns of phrase that tickle your fancy (such as ‘tickle your fancy’, and use them for inspiration.

Set writing goals:

Like most areas of my life, I apply a goal process to get things moving, and when writing- especially so. It might be a certain number of words a day (hello NANOWRIMO), or a project stage. Some people like the whole ‘don’t break the chain’ concept where each day of writing earns a red cross on the calendar, or set time based goals such as publishing a weekly blog post.

Schedule:

Make writing a priority, and set aside non-negotiable time in your workplan or schedule to tackle writing projects. If you can’t squeeze a daily writing practice into your schedule, then aim for regular batch writing sessions, monthly or quarterly, which I find incredibly productive.

Write without entanglement:

By this I mean bang out your writing project, then go back and polish. One of my Master of Writing and Literature lecturers used to bellow ‘you can’t edit a blank page’ and looking back, I’m pretty sure he lifted that from another great literary mind, but it’s true.

Banish fluff:

Both in your writing but more importantly in your process. Don’t sit at your desk, staring out the window, waiting for a muse to wander by, swinging her hips and showering you in a wave of inspiration. I honestly don’t believe in writer’s block- instead I prepare against feeling blocked by having a ready supply of content ideas and post plans. Who has time to wait for inspiration to strike?

Tell me, do you believe in writer’s block?

This is a post in my Writing for Business blog series . Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my writing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock writing a range of products, tactics to online communications glory and how to use communications and PR to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

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Entice People Around Your Website

Want people to move around your website?

Creating a website is a massive project. A whole ton of blood, sweat and tears go to each step of a website build, from the copywriting, the design and structure, the coding and the visuals and branding, to finding the perfect photo for your about page. Do you have beautiful website? Have you created an online space where people want to hang out, to linger, to move from space to fabulous space? Do you have a fantastic user experience that allows your visitors to seamlessly and effortlessly learn more about you and your work, with navigation that is intuitive, simple, logical and helps people find what they’re looking for?

Psst- get my FREE Website Essentials Checklist when you join the Blue51 community of business owners going great guns with their communications.

Website Essentials Checklist

What happens when you build an incredible user experience with on point navigation, yet your Google Analytics tell you that people aren’t moving past your home page?  Sometimes, people just like a bit of a guided tour, and today I’m giving you ways to virtually hold someone’s hand, and gently, yet emphatically yank them around your business’ online home.

Here’s some tips to guide visitors around all the pages you so lovingly built on your website.

Facebook:

Facebook has lots of opportunities to send people to specific pages on your website.  What’s your social media strategy? Is it to regularly showcase your people, your services or products, or to provide answers to those questions about your business that you’re asked time and time again? Providing direct links to specific pages with good captioning is a great way to move people around your website pages. Another opportunity is to take advantage of Facebook’s About and Services sections to provide links to pages you wish to drive traffic to.

Instagram:

Instagram is more limited than Facebook in that the one linkable space is within the bio- so make it work for you and for your business. Your link is the Call To Action of your Instagram account, so have it directing people to the number one place you’d like them to land, based on your business goal. Is it to build your list? Have it directed to your landing page. Is it to share a recent blog post? Link it to your blog page. You get the drift.

New enquiries:

I have quite an elaborate proposal document which I provide to people requesting quotes on my services. I include the all-important dollars and cents, but I also give people an overview of me, and of Blue51 communications. Depending on the services they’re requesting quotes on I often provide links to case study posts of similar projects, and I include links to my testimonials page.

Onboarding new clients:

Once a client accepts my proposal and has paid a deposit to get cracking, I have a welcome kit that I provide that outlines expectations for working together and confirms deliverables, but again I use as an opportunity to take people for a tour of my website.

Landing pages and mailing list welcome confirmations:

People have expressed an interest in your work by signing up to your mailing list, so the logical next step is to for them to be guided around your website. Include the pages that are most relevant, such as blog posts connected to the opt-in they’ve signed up for, information about working with you or the pages that share the content that your happy clients have provided about you and how ah-ma-zing you are.

Calls to action:

Every single page of your website, including each blog post is an opportunity to direct people around your website.

Tell me, when you visit a website are you a bouncer or a lounger?

This is a post in my Digital Marketing blog series  . Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

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Feel Like Giving Your Digital Content Marketing Away?

Feeling like giving away your content marketing strategy?

Every now and then an article pops up that sharing free content is a dead strategy, that it’s a waste of valuable time and energy and has very little benefit to a business’ bottom line. As a communications specialist, a writer for business and someone who works in digital communications and marketing every day- ERRY SINGLE DAY, I tells ya- I wholeheartedly say ‘nay’. #buggeroffnaysayers

It’s a rare communications plan of mine that doesn’t include content marketing as part of an overarching communications strategy. Why, you ask? When content, useful, helpful, beautiful content is sprinkled out into the world like alphabet confetti the benefits are remarkable, and the ROI can be so significant that giving up isn’t an option.

Psst- want my FREE 1 Page Communications Planning Quicky Checklist? Damn straight you do!

Get my Communications Planning 1 Pager Quicky

So why should you give away the inner workings of your brain via free content?

Here’s the thing- people expect freebies. It’s that simple. Give it away, give it away, give it away, give it away, now*. Content marketing and the sharing economy are well established forms of marketing that people expect, and are well recognised as a way to connect with people, to build a community of people who love your business and your intellectual brainpower and a way to establish yourself as the go to filly/fella in your niche.

Need more convincing?

Establish authority:

The more you talk constructively and actively about your area of expertise, the more you share your experience, skills and knowledge via free information, the more you provide helpful, informative content that gives your readers a clear benefit the more you are viewed as the as the expert in your field, the go to person.

Try before you buy:

People get a sense of what it’s like to work with you through your content. Content marketing allows you to show not only your expertise, but your passions, your interests and your personality. I had a client contact me after stumbling upon this post, and apparently my ‘punch in the New Year right in the face’ comment was quite compelling, and labelled me as ‘spunky.’ Who am I to argue?

Create a following that’s not built on the neighbour’s property:

When you create a connection with an audience on your own real estate- ie your blog or your website- you have a smidge more control over how you communicate with your audience, particularly if your free content is delivered via an email list. If Facebook announces a new algorithm change that feels a whole lot like being pushed to pay to play, you can still reach your audience’s inboxes, if not their feeds.

Build trust:

Over time, people feel like they know you, and that not only do you really you know your stuff, you’re someone with content that provides a tangible benefit to their business, and that they genuinely like hearing from. If you are regularly adding value and a bit of fun to someone’s inbox, readers do show gratitude by sharing your content and by engaging with it with comments, likes and double taps and other such lovelies.

Here’s the kicker- you may not necessarily convert every recipient of your free content into a client. That’s okay. You’ve still put some pretty fabulous goodwill out into the world, and you will have shared information that helps people in their daily lives. That’s never a waste.

Tell me, are you convinced to keep plugging away at your content marketing, providing free content, or are you ready to have a crack?

A logical next step is an editorial calendar to keep all your free content ideas aligned to your broader business communications goal- here’s one I prepared earlier.

*Admit it, you’re fighting the urge not to rip off your shirt and jump around singing this Chilli Peppers classic, aren’t’ you.

This is a post in my Communications Toolkit blog series  . Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my communications and copywriting bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock copywriting a range of products, tactics to communications glory and how to use communications and PR to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

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Blue51 Show and Tell- Celebrate your Business

Blue51 Gosh Hair Celebrate in business

Applying for a business award is an opportunity for people in business to take the chance to really examine achievements and business philosophy in the level of detail that they deserve. Working with clients to navigate the process is an opportunity for me as a communications specialist to help them shine a light on their fabulous work and be recognised for their role in the local community.

Today’s Blue51 Show and Tell shares the business award process with one of my favourite clients, Gosh Hair in Mount Waverley*.

The project:

A local government Award Nomination on behalf of my client, Gosh Hair, to celebrate and acknowledge the incredible work they do in their local community, work that they don’t bat an immaculately made up eyelid at.

The client:

Gosh Hair Mount Waverley is a contemporary, cas-luxe hair salon with fun, professional staff that provide clients with a beautiful experience. Everything at Gosh Hair starts with their passion for people- and they’re incredibly proud of the reputation and strong networks they have both within their local community, and in the hair industry in general.

The client’s target audience:

Gosh Hair has a unique mix of clients- from children, families, and men and women across all age brackets. Clients include children, men and women in their early-twenties to mothers of preschoolers and school children to grandparents.

The approach:

The award nomination process involved a written application and a verbal presentation addressing some key criteria. As I was drafting the application, my goal was to highlight that Gosh isn’t an everyday business, but one with an admirable commitment to corporate social responsibility. This became the focus of my writing, and I used lots of emotive language and action-based words to convey the depth of the service Gosh provides their local community- way beyond that of a ‘stock standard’ salon.

Here’s the message Denise, Gosh’s owner, shared at the Award nomination event:

We’ve won lots of awards over the years as a salon for our technical expertise, but what I’m most proud of is that in an industry that can be sometimes viewed as somewhat superficial, my business is actively and passionately committed to the wellbeing of our clients, our local community and our environment.

Like most salons these days, social media is a huge part of our business, and of course we love sharing quotes that inspire and reflect our work at Gosh hair. One in particular that I personally love is:

‘You attract the energy you exude.’

Our energy is channeled into working hard to ensure that every client who leaves our salon walks out our door feeling heard, feeling like they have beautiful hair that they’ll be able to manage and maintain themselves, that they’ve just been spoiled, and that their needs have been met.

We do this by investing heavily in training, far beyond what is required for my staff regardless of where they are at in their professional journey- each month I close the salon for an afternoon so my staff can have intensive training on techniques, and in 2015, we all had AUSLAN training so clients from our community with hearing impairments can have consultations in their own language, so to speak.

My staff are all from the local community, and went to local schools, and it’s fantastic to work so closely with them and their schools as they finish their education whilst working with me. Over the years, I’ve had apprentices that have gone on to achieve wonderful things such as Apprentice of the Year, Stylist of the Year, and then have opened their own successful businesses, to then work with their local community to support the next generation of young people entering our industry.

As a local business, we are approached a lot by kindergartens, schools and community groups for service donations, and we have a wall full of appreciation certificates. Last year, we  had a beautiful little client come into the salon to cut off her ponytail to be donated to charity to be made into a wig for people with cancer. She inspired her friend to do the same, but her friend attached a fundraising goal to it, and raised over $5000 for Challenge. We shared in the celebration when one of my stylists went along to the school assembly to do the ‘big chop.’ Since that day, we’ve had a tribe of little girls coming in to the salon to donate their ponytails. It feels fantastic to be part of something so selfless and giving, particularly when we know there’s a lot of people within our community that are fighting their own cancer battles. In fact, we work with a lot of clients who are facing hair loss, and we offer specialised services for those clients, including shaving their heads, and styling their wigs as we would their hair-we want to make their battle just one bit easier by helping them manage their appearance.

Whilst I’m so proud of the impact my business has on the wellbeing of our clients, and of our local community, I’m equally proud of the lack of impact we have on the environment. We’re one of Australia’s few truly eco-friendly salons. Our basins are connected to water tanks and solar panels generate the vast majority of our energy. We have long-term partnerships with product manufacturers DeLorenzo Australia, an Australian-owned business that creates beautiful, eco-friendly hair products.

Thanks again for the opportunity to present here today- I could talk all day about Gosh, but as I said, everything we do at Gosh Hair starts with our passion for people.

The creators:

Overarching awards communications strategy and copywriting by yours truly, flip worthy hair and feel good content provided by Gosh Hair.

The results:

The Award winners won’t be announced until later this year, however, Gosh Hair has been promoted heavily via the Award’s communications channels, and at the Nomination lunch received much support- in fact, people in attendance have changed salons so as to experience the Gosh Hair difference for themselves!

Tell me, what do you think about business awards?

*You’re all my favourites…

This is a post in my blog series  about Blue51 Show and Tell. Each month, I share some of the projects I’m working on for my fabulous clients. I can’t wait to show you both the work we’re producing, as well as the amazing results they’re achieving in their businesses. 

There’s more unabashed bragging on my Facebook and Instagram feeds. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help.

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Writer Schmiter- Why Outsource Your Writing Projects? 

Writing for business- why outsource your writing projects

Grammar and spelling not your thing? Takes you forever to bang out a 300 word article? Need to update your flyer or website but you get tangled in words? Gosh, don’t put yourself through that quagmire when there are people out there with Masters in this shiz- aka me.

Yes, writing for me is more than something I have a bit of a ‘knack’ in- I’m tertiary qualified. For a while there, I had a bit of an addiction to study, and I have a Master of Arts in Communications, and a Master of Writing and Literature. I couldn’t have got through them without a fairly decent grasp on where to stick a (God forsaken) apostrophe or two. My Writing and Literature Masters, teamed with my Communications Masters means not only do I know how to write, I know how to use writing effectively to generate an outcome and meet a goal. I write for the media- no I don’t mean the daily newspaper, although I have, and do, ghostwriting for clients. I mean I write for the intended delivery method best suited to the intended message recipient. Flyers for promoting an event need to be crafted differently to your services page, and your email campaigns are a completely different style of writing to your social media captions.

People in business often have massive creativity, impeccable services and unique ideas, but when it comes to convey their attributes in writing they get tangled up in jargon or stilted, ‘professional’, best Year 11 essay language.

Here’s some of the types of people in business who typically handball their writing projects to me:

  • People who feel too close to their business and their work to be objective enough to convey it accurately and effectively in writing.
  • People who’ve held a long term attachment to jargon and lingo that their colleagues in the know understand, but confuses their mother, let alone their potential clients.
  • People who are too busy running their business to write about their business.
  • People who find it really difficult to explain on paper both what they do, and the benefits they could genuinely bring to peoples’ lives.

Tell me, do you know how to wield an apostrophe?

This is a post in my Writing for Business blog series . Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my writing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock writing a range of products, tactics to online communications glory and how to use communications and PR to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

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Say hello to my new logo!

blue51 Communications logo

Like the plumber with leaky taps, for over two years I had ‘visual rebrand’ on my to-do list, but two weeks ago I put a lovely big line through that little item. How good does it feel to tick off a nagging task?

I love working with designers, those creative, yet strategic masterminds. They know how to ask the questions that cut to the core of a brand. The opportunity for reflection is one I took to with great gusto, and did the business and branding version of navel gazing until I gave myself whiplash.  The whole crux of my business, inclusive of all my services- communications advising, social media management or business writing- is helping my clients communicate better. I help people in business say something and have their message heard by an intended recipient. Without exception, there’s no better visual cue to convey the concept of conversation than a speech bubble- and hence, my logo concept!

Let me know what you think!

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It’s An Honour To Be Nominated

Blue51 Monash Business Award Nomination

Last week I was invited to speak at the Monash Business Awards April Networking lunch as a part of my successful nomination for the micro-business category. Below is the bare bones of what I shared in my presentation:

Hi, I’m Holly. I’m a communications advisor, a writer, a social media specialist, a word nerd, and I’m also a bit of a grammar snob- in fact I’m here today because one of my beautiful clients told me to self-nominate, and said if I didn’t, she’d nominate Blue51, and that I’d hate what she’d do with the apostrophes.

I work with people who struggle to use communications effectively in their businesses. Clients come to me knowing their communications aren’t what they should or could be. Some clients haven’t touched their communications since their business launched, and they’re still rocking their original website which doesn’t work on mobiles. Some are stuck in a cycle of scattergun strategies to get their name out there which cost a bomb and don’t get the results they’re looking for.  Some lose far too much time sweating over word choice for their blog posts or their social media captions, and feel sick at the start of each month knowing that the Godforsaken newsletter needs to go out- and I know that’s what some of you call it.

The beauty of my business is that I can provide as much or as little support as needed. Some people just need to bounce ideas around which they then go off and implement, some ask me for a full plan of attack for their business communications to keep them on track and aligned to their business goals, some ask me to take care of their writing projects, or content marketing or social media while they focus on their core business. Others prefer me to make their lives easier by simply handballing their communications to me, and I manage their social media, I handle all of their content and email campaigns and I write communications strategies to promote them. Many of my clients see me as an outsourced member of their team, and even include me in their footy tipping.

I love what I do, and I love helping my clients grow their businesses with  beautiful communications. My happy place is when a client is as excited about their communications as I am, having moved from ‘I hate this’ to loving it.  I may have even converted a few data nerds into word nerds in the process- OK so that’s a bit of an embellishment!

Excitement overload, let me tell you!

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Editorial Calendars Made Simple

Content marketing, am I right? It’s so hot right now, and no doubt the main biz advice screeching at you in your social media feeds is telling you to get your content out there in the world, and tout sweet!

Guess what- the hype is true. Digital marketing, with a strong content focus, is incredibly powerful in terms of brand awareness, thought leadership and turning leads into clients. However, like any communications, it needs to be strategic and aligned to your brand and your business goals. Don’t go throwing out blog posts or podcasts for the sake of it- give your content marketing a bit of love and a bit of strategy.

Enter the editorial calendar…

Google ‘editorial calendar templates’ and brace yourself for an onslaught. Personally, I use paper, then plug in the details into a spreadsheet. I have colleagues who love tools like Asana (which I use for other purposes) but the tool is largely irrelevant. A content or editorial is basically a planning tool, and a way to organise your:

  • key topics of information
  • posts that provide content against these
  • dates for publishing the content.

Get thyself a monthly, quarterly and yearly planner- there are a gazillion templates online, or maybe even start with a big piece of paper.

Insert into your planners all the essential dates to both your business and your personal life. Include launches, events new product or service development and releases, anniversaries and marketing projects. Basically, enter all of the milestones you’re anticipating. It’s important to include external days such as formal holidays, as well as random quirky holidays that suit your business such as Talk like a Pirate Day- seriously, who doesn’t love that one? Although, my personal all time favourite is Word Nerd Day.

Develop  a list of content ideas that align to your business goals, the needs of your target audience and of course your area of expertise. It’s easy (sometimes) to generate lots of content ideas- what’s more difficult though is to develop the ideas into a coherent, logical and strategic* format. How? By taking all those fabulous ideas and group them according to overarching themes. I restrict my themes to four:

  • Communications
  • Digital marketing
  • Copywriting
  • Blue51 Show and Tell

Why four? Because generally there are four weeks in a month, which means at least once per month, one of these key themes gets some love, and because I like to blog weekly. Keep it simple!

Finally, include a process for the process:

  • Research
  • Write
  • Edit
  • Create a graphic
  • Publish
  • Create social media graphics
  • Schedule promotion within social media calendar.

Gah, that’s a lot of content when talking content, I get that. The most important thing to keep in mind with all this is to remember why you’re using content marketing in your communications in the first place. Yes, it will build your credibility, but more importantly, when done well, and done strategically, it will give your audience something they’re looking for, and provide a solution what ails them. No biggie. No denying it can take a lot of time though, and if it’s taking you too far away from your core business, or if writing’s not your strong suit, outsource it. I love content marketing- give me a buzz.

*yes, I know, I bang on about being strategic. It’s because I’m unapologetically anti-scattergun. Can’t tolerate it, and I shan’t.

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What are you trying to achieve with your business communications?

Just as Greenery is the new black, it seems for many of us working mamas juggling cherubs and business, February is the new January. And of course, there can be no January, faux or otherwise, without a ton of business planning, now can there? Over the past few weeks, my Instagram feed ha been chock-a-block full of images of goal setting for the year ahead, including this particularly fetching and on-brand post*.

Communications goal setting is an essential part of all of my communications coaching work with clients, and of course I apply communications goals to my own business. Here’s the kicker though- unless there’s clarity around business goals, it’s really hard to set robust communications goals:

The sole purpose of communications goals are to support overarching business goals.

When communications goals are aligned to business goals, they become strategic and targeted by default, with a focus on the end result, which is usually tied to business performance measures such as client growth and income targets.

We all know the SMART goal setting principle, but I’m gonna spell it out again, because I wanna:

S: Specific

M: Measurable

A: Actionable

R: Relevant

T: time-based

The most common communications goals my clients work towards are brand awareness, increasing client list, increasing mailing list and/or website traffic, increased perception as industry/sector leaders and increased attendance at events. All of those communications goals support the business goals such as revenue, service provision and business growth.

The process can be quite convoluted, but I like to keep things simple when setting communications goals- I’m good like that.

  • What is the business trying or wanting to achieve?
  • What are the communications goals that will meet this?
  • What are the strategies, tactics and actions which will do this?
  • How will success be measured?

Would you like an example? Of course you would!

Business A is a health and fitness class and in 2017 wants to focus on filling their group training classes as a means to achieve a financial target (Business Goal). The communications goals to achieve this are brand and service awareness, increase in lead generation and conversion, and positioning Business A as a business that helps their clients achieve staggering transformations. The strategies, tactics and actions Business A will implement to achieve their communications goals are a social media strategy with a Facebook ad campaign, an email campaign targeting former clients, an email campaign with a promotion for existing clients to refer a friend, and attendance at a local community event. The measures of success that Business A will look for are an increase in social media followers, and increase in list sizes, and of course, the numbers of people sweating it up in their classes each day.

That’s a really quick example, and I have another here, and here. Setting communications goals with the end business goals in mind keeps your communications activities focused and targeted. The messages you put out via your tactics- social media, website copy, even your pitch- are addressing and meeting your overarching business goals.

No-one likes an ill-thought out scattergun approach, hoping something will stick- no, a communications roadmap is a much preferable way to manage business communications. If you’d like a roadmap for your very own,  give me a buzz.

*disclaimer: I’m far too much of a type-A control freak to have waited until I was ‘officially’ back at work to do my planning. I actually start my new year planning in the middle of the last quarter of the year before, and the post in the pic was me sneaking a day away from the beach to give some loving to my divine yearly planner.

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This is a post in my Communications Toolkit blog series  . Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my communications and copywriting bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock copywriting a range of products, tactics to communications glory and how to use communications and PR to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.