Affiliate and influencer marketing minus the ick

Affiliate and influencer marketing minus the ick

Influencer and affiliate marketing is massive, and it’s application ranges from the dare I say it, authentically good, to the god-awful- still authentically, though maybe unintentionally. Yes, I’m looking at you, flogger of those insanely long sales email campaigns spruiking someone else’s product, because without it you never would have had your first twelve figure week and you just genuinely, wholeheartedly believe it in it. And yes, today I’m wearing my ‘I’m a churlish witch’ t-shirt…

Here’s five quick tips if you’re thinking of adding the exchange of opinions for goods and or beautiful cash whilst keeping the integrity of your business communications intact:

1- Ensure the product or service you’re endorsing is relevant to both your audience and to your business branding across all channels, including the disappearing ones! Instagram stories should be used with the same level of attention to branding as the rest of  your channels. #justsayin

2- Make the endorsement more than just a pitch- be entertaining, be educational, be informative or be inspiring. Go past the content that you’ve been provide with because there’s nothin gmore insipid than reading a review or an endorsement that is basically a copy and paste of what’s on the product website or catalogue.

3- Get the essential details right about your endorsement- what it is, the benefits it suggests, the benefits you experienced, the thoughts, thinkings and processes behind it.

4- Trust is incredibly important- so too is transparency and accountability, and this is conveyed by a clear opinion that may slightly deviate from that of the brand.

5- Come up with a rating system *that’s unique to your brand to help your followers gauge your response. A rating system establishes a consistent benchmark, and makes it super easy for you to create user generated content on social media.

* Disclaimer- The Great Burger Caper is a client, and no, I wasn’t paid for this blog post in burgers or cash, and opinions are wholly my own.

Tell me, what’s your take on good (or bad) influencer and affiliate marketing?

This is a post in my Writing for Business blog series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems.  If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

The Blueprint - Monthly Newsletter

The Blueprint - Get gorgeous communications direct to your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Is your dream client in a Facebook group?

Is your dream client in a Facebook group?

Question-

What communications strategy is best for your business?

Answer-

Those that will help you reach your business goals.

Question-

What’s the best way to use communications to reach my ideal audience so I reach my business goals?

Answer-

Wherever they are hanging out!

More than one billion people are using Facebook Groups, so there’s a good chance that your ideal client is there too. Hey, you’re on Facebook more than you should be; might as well make it part of your communications strategy, am I right?

I really love Facebook groups as a business communications strategy, and am a member of several. There’s some really good ones, and some equally bad ones. The groups I love may have crossed my path by way of a value add from a challenge, a purchase or a course, or they were recommended to me. There’s almost a tangible sense of community, of people coming together online to share ideas, share support, encouragement and motivation.

Here’s some benefits from joining Facebook groups:

Find out what’s hot and what’s not

Have an idea for your business but not sure if it will stick? Trying to decide between directions for a strategy or process? Bounce it around your favourite group and get feedback from lots of different people.

A connection and a community

Sometimes, having a business is professionally lonely. Facebook groups can offer a virtual community, complete with shared purpose and vision, and depending on your business, your ideal audience. Connection is powerful, and my experience is the people in my favourite groups share generously with support and encouragement.

They’re a vehicle for sharing your expertise in a non-salesy way

Positioning yourself as a thought leader and go-to person for your niche is made simple in a forum that’s based on providing support and information. When people ask questions or raise their business issues within the group that relate to your zone of genius- answer them! Be helpful, professional and provide simple solutions. Don’t go nuts and give away all your IP, but it’s usually completely appropriate to offer people the option of sending you a PM or an email for more information. You can also share tips or blog posts to groups with specific threads that call for such content.

Three quick tips:

  1. Read the group rules and abide by them- aka don’t be a dick!
  2. Respond to Promo threads as directed- refer to point 1 above.
  3. Make sure you make it easy for people to find out about your work by linking your business page to your About page in your personal profile.

Tell me, are Facebook groups part of your business communications strategy?

This is a post in my Digital Marketing blog series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems.  If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

Pick Your Perfect Social Media Platform

Targeting your ideal client

Targeting your ideal client

Having a clear understanding of your target audience or dream client is essential to beautifully effective communications. Disclaimer- I purposely avoid being a niche business because I love the diversity of my client base and subsequently the projects I work on. That said, I do have a very clear understanding about my audience in terms of my communications strategies and approaches and the voice I use for my business writing, and I have the same mentality when it comes to my client work.

Defining your client or audience can be right up there with a root canal. I’ve seen business advisors suggest creating an imaginary client avatar by completing a twenty page dossier that would put ASIO to shame. I think that’s a bit over the top, but there are some essentials to nail down, and can depend on a number of variables. If your business has a model of being business to business, your messaging and communications will be slightly different to a business to consumer model. However, the basics you should have in mind are your dream clients’ age range, their location, their motivations, their fears, hopes and dreams as they relate to your offering:

  • What is this person wanting to achieve?
  • What are this person’s pain points and problem areas?
  • What are your services/products that can help this person achieve their desires?

This is, as I say, quite basic, but the detail comes when you do further defining via your key communications messages, and outline how you solve your target audience’s pain points quite specifically. The more deeply you understand your dream client’s problems, the more you will have in terms of content to communicate how your solutions can resolve their issues. Your messages will write themselves.*

Want an example? Imagine you are a personal trainer specialising in fat loss for women over 40 who are time poor.  The messages that are going to target this audience will be completely different to those of a personal trainer who works with clients in their twenties who want to enter body building competitions.

I’m supremely chuffed when a client tells me in beautiful specific language about their target audiences. If you’d like some help nailing down your messages to directly target your ideal client, you might be interested in my communications advising services– and I’d love to work with you!

Tell me, do you feel like you have a good handle on your target audience?

*Of course, for many people, messages don’t write themselves, but are written by highly skilled Word Nerds. Like yours truly…

This is a post in my Communications Toolkit blog series  . Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my communications and copywriting bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock copywriting a range of products, tactics to communications glory and how to use communications and PR to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

The Blueprint - Monthly Newsletter

The Blueprint - Get gorgeous communications direct to your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Blue51 Show and Tell: Generating a Buzz

Blue51 Show and Tell Generating a Buzz

Today’s Blue51 Show and Tell gives an insight into the communications approach I suggested for a client to generate excitement about a business opportunity she was launching.

The project:

A communications strategy to generate a buzz for a series of recruitment events.

The client:

The Independent Mum, a primarily online business, is an independent Arbonne consultant. The Independent Mum gives it’s owner (the ridiculously gorgeous Kate) a means to blend her busy family life with a career that gives her the opportunity to apply her extensive marketing, sales, management and leadership skills and experience. The Independent Mum has a team that extends across Australia, New Zealand and the United States with plans for further international growth.

The client’s target audience:

The Independent Mum’s audience for this strategy were potential Arbonne Consultants in a specific geographic location, who were women between the ages of 30 and 50 frustrated with their existing work/life balance, were open minded and creative, smart, resilient, brave and fun

The approach:

The Independent Mum and I met for my Clean Up Your Communications service to get clarity in communications, to get right to the core of the business messages and to come up with a detailed plan of attack for Kate to implement.

The communications objective was to generate a buzz of excitement with the goal of having women attending a series of information sessions to find out more about becoming consultants.  We achieved this through the following strategies:

  • Development of a set of clear key messages to be used across all platforms and communications to target directly the ideal audience.
  • A strategy designed to promote The Independent Mum’s thought leadership and business acumen branding.
  • An intensive social media strategy including daily posting (minimum), a schedule of Facebook lives addressing key messages, sales and promos, FAQs, and the creation of Facebook events.
  • An Instagram hashtag strategy directly targeting the geographic region hosting the events.

The results:

My client had a fabulous series of events with the women she’d targeted, with the attributes she was seeking. She’s applied the strategies developed as part of this strategy across her range of events, and has a loyal, engaged tribe of social media followers. Her team is growing, and she’s still beautifully balancing the needs of her busy, growing business with those of her super busy three kids.

Tell me, what do you do to generate a buzz in your business?

This is a post in my Blue51 Show and Tell blog series . Each month, I share some of the projects I’m working on for my fabulous clients. I can’t wait to show you both the work we’re producing, as well as the amazing results they’re achieving in their businesses. 

There’s more unabashed bragging on my Facebook and Instagram feeds. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help.

Get my Communications Planning 1 Pager Quicky

Brainstorm your way to a full content schedule

brainstorm your way to a full content schedule

Pst… this here blog post comes with a sweet little freeby that will set your writing on FIRE! Keep reading, and all shall be revealed…

I don’t believe in writer’s block. If I waited for the muse to strike then I’d never getting anything done. Having said that, ideas don’t always flow, but after being a working writer for such a long time, almost twenty years now (Sheesh, how did that happen?) I have a few tricks up my sleeve for when I’m not feeling particularly inspired, but still need to churn out some words.

Here’s some ways to gather ideas to feed your content marketing strategy:

FFS, oops I mean FAQ

What is it that time and time again you get asked about in terms of your work or your industry? What is it you wished you were asked about your work? Take ten minutes (seriously, put on an egg timer) and scribble down all the questions you can think of that come up in your client meetings, your enquiries and in your general conversations with people about your work. Turn each of these into a beautiful piece of content.

Old school mind maps

Confession- I love a mind map, and a lot of writers do. They’re a great way to plot out anything from a series of poems (#wildchild), a novel, or to plan and execute interviews. Try a mind map of your service offerings to imagine what their titles could conjure up in the minds of your clients. Put each main service offering you have in the centre of a sheet of paper and use them as spark words to create ideas of topics that could become blog posts, fact sheets or articles you could send to your mailing list.

Look within

Within your Google analytics, I mean. There’s a wealth of data there for you to mine for your content writing plan of attack. What search terms are leading people to your website? Are these the terms you’re expecting? Let them inspire you, and brainstorm content against each.

Get help

If you’re feeling well and truly stumped, or completely uninspired, then go to a tool like Buzzsumo to get you moving. Chuck in your preferred keywords, and out shall spew forth a ton of content topics that perform well in your niche.

Tell me, do you struggle with finding ideas to write about?

This is a post in my Writing for Business blog series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems.  If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

My Top 10 Go-To Writing Prompts

How to stand up for yourself online

How to stand up for yourself online

A client recently reached out to me for advice after receiving a 2 stare review on Facebook with quite a personalised and nasty comment. The comments in the review had some fairly decent factual inaccuracies (aka around 17kilos worth of BS) and my client was eager to make it disappear.

Here’s my suggested steps for avoiding a shitstorm/standing up for yourself/responding to negative feedback in a public forum:

Reveal, don’t conceal*

Respond to the comment in the same forum. Don’t ignore it. Hit reply, and acknowledge the comment, and acknowledge the concern and what you intend to do about it (see next point).

Go private

Try to take the conversation offline by writing something along the lines of ‘Hi {insert name}, thank you for reaching out. Please contact us directly on {insert email address} so we can get this situation sorted out.’ Don’t engage in a public back and forth dialogue, but be authentic, helpful and human in your response, not (really) for the sake of the reviewer, but for the sake of the other people who may come across this interaction in the future.

Go into corpse pose for just a (mindful) moment

Or whatever it is you need to do to get your blood down from a rolling boil to a gentle simmer. Never respond beyond an acknowledgement and seek further details online response whilst you’re feeling fired up.

Fact correct

If appropriate, and if the person continues to denigrate your business, reiterate your request for them to contact you privately whilst correcting some facts, politely and professionally. You might write ‘Thanks, {insert name}, as I initially responded, please contact me via email as I’m keen to have this situation addressed. According to our records/staff, the situation was {describe situation in polar opposite of review}. Do it in a way that is respectful, yet clear to other people reading that can see the situation for what it is. Engage only once, and again as a person to reinforce the fact that you are a business that is caring, responsive and measured.

Completely out of line?

Check the review host’s (Facebook, Google, Yelp etc) site rules to see if the review breaches them. If the review is completely out of line, is false or inappropriate, or  includes profanity, threats of violence, racism or sexism then request the review is removed on the grounds of breaching rules of use.

Embrace the silver lining

You may find that your other clients will see the reviews and jump to your defence; that’s exactly what happened with my client. A whole ton of clients flooded their Facebook page with beautiful comments and five-star reviews. The negative review also may give you some insight or perspective into tightening up some of your processes moving forward.

Yep, a negative review in a public forum can feel like a whole bucket of poo raining down upon you, but a few deep breaths and a calm, professional and measured response will set things straight again. That and a few choice f-bombs that you share solely with your biz bestie.

Tell me, how do you respond to online negative reviews?

*If you’re not now humming along to ‘Let it Go’ then I salute you.

 

This is a post in my Digital Marketing blog series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems.  If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

The Blueprint - Monthly Newsletter

The Blueprint - Get gorgeous communications direct to your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Blue51 Show and Tell: Filling a Funnel

Filling a funnel Blue51 Show and Tell

As a writer, I do love a good metaphor, and as a communications advisor, there’s not much I love more than helping my clients fill their funnels. Why? In basic terms, a funnel is the path a person takes on the journey towards working with you. The purpose of all communications, marketing and sales activity is to guide your prospects along a determined (by you) path with multiple entry points, with a specific destination that is closely aligned to your broader business goals.

Today’s Blue51 Show and Tell gives an insight into the communications strategy I created for a client to fill her funnel to bursting to subsequently fill her online relationships programs for couples and for singles.

The project:

A communications strategy to promote an online relationships course.

The client:

The Relationships Workshop provides events and workshops for both couples and singles to learn the skills and strategies for successful relationships. The Relationship Workshop has a relatively well-established brand, a robust current and former client database and an active Facebook presence, all developed independent of a strategic, overarching communications plan.  The Relationship Workshop planned to add online program delivery to the suite of services and wanted a strategic communications plan to support the launch of the online program.

The client’s target audience:

The Relationship Workshop’s audience for the strategy were identified primarily as women- although the programs are applicable to men and to women, women tend to be the key drivers and purchasers of programs.

The approach:

The Relationships Workshop and I met for my Clean Up Your Communications service, my power-packed and solution-focused 60 minute communications advising session to get clarity in communications, and get right to the core of the business messages. We bounced around ideas in a way that is practical and solutions-focused, and the pre-session questionnaire completed by The Relationships Workshop guided my research before we met, which maximised our time together. We got straight down to the nitty-gritty of the optimum communications to get virtual bums on virtual seats at The Relationship Workshops’ online course.

The communications objective was to raise awareness of the availability of online training and to fill the sales funnel with highly-motivated potential clients.  We achieved this through the following strategies:

  • An intensive social media strategy with a focus on Facebook, including daily posting (minimum), a schedule of Facebook lives addressing key messages, key benefits and FAQs, and the creation of a closed Facebook group.
  • A tweak to the existing Instagram activity including updating the bio with a strong call to action that sends visitors to landing page, aligning content more tightly to Facebook content, and sharing posts (with full accreditation) of ‘like’ businesses such as wedding photographers, date night venues, jewellery etc
  • Online networking in business and relationship Facebook groups that included the target audience.
  • Development on mailing list building activities including a five day challenge.
  • an eDM campaign to existing and former clients to tell them about online course, and ask them to forward information about program.
  • Exploring collaborative opportunities with aligned businesses.
  • Optimise the b’jesus out of the existing website and landing pages.

The results:

It’s early days, but my client has been flat chat implementing the strategies we determined, and had a super robust cohort of attendees in her first online program- a fabulous result for something so new, and so relatively groundbreaking.

Tell me, do you feel like your communications are creating a constant trickle of prospective clients into your sales funnel or are you feeling a little blocked? Please get in touch– I’d love to help out.

 

This is a post in my Blue51 Show and Tell blog series . Each month, I share some of the projects I’m working on for my fabulous clients. I can’t wait to show you both the work we’re producing, as well as the amazing results they’re achieving in their businesses. 

There’s more unabashed bragging on my Facebook and Instagram feeds. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help.

Pick Your Perfect Social Media Platform

Nail your voice to tell your story…

nail your voice and tell your story

Have you ever met someone in real life who is a complete disconnect from their online or in writing persona? It’s decidedly disconcerting, even more disconcerting than my undying love of adverbs, if that’s possible. Sometimes people who are warm, funny, approachable, accessible and engaging in real life come across as overly formal, stuffy, forced or contrived in writing, and vice versa! Why? They haven’t nailed their voice.

Here’s the thing; nailing voice is not easy. There was an entire study unit dedicated solely to voice in my Master of Arts (Writing and Literature) in the context of narrative, non-fiction and fiction, because voice is one of the critical elements of readability. In terms of business writing, especially writing for small businesses, I don’t think the importance of voice can be understated. Why? Storytelling is such a fabulous way to have people engage with your brand, and be more inclined to work with you.

We know that people buy from people and/or brands they like and so your voice (or your brand’s voice) should evoke both your likability, and the essence of your personality. The person in the email or in the social media caption should be a super close representation of what comes out of your mouth and your body language when you meet someone face to face. I know I’m doing my job well, and that I’ve nailed a client’s voice, when I get personal messages to them via their social platforms, sometimes a little too personal!

Here’s some quick tips to improve the expression of your voice:

Write like you speak

Writing for business isn’t the same as university assignments with correct citations, hypotheses and an absence of contractions. Not many people say ‘do not’ in a sentence- unless it’s directed to the offspring about to push a sibling into the swimming pool. Record yourself if you need to, and take note of the nuances in your expression- that’s your voice!

Read your work aloud

Before you hit publish on an email, a blog post or a social media caption quickly read it aloud. If it’s clunky, or if you trip over words your voice is out.

Be a fit for your audience

Voice isn’t just what you say, but it’s also how you say it, and like all communications needs to be a fit for your brand, and for your audience. The language, expressions and turns of phrases that you’d use if your brand was in the surfing industry targeting adolescents is completely different to that of a marriage celebrant targeting baby-boomers celebrating late(r) in life love.

Channel your passion

Ooh, Google, this one might confuse you… Regardless of your industry and your target audience, nailing your voice is much, much easier when you have some passion and enthusiasm for the content you’re sharing. If appropriate and not totes awks (as my ten year old says) record yourself talking to a friend about your content. For example, if the content is your website about page via website tell your friend what it is you stand for, what you want to do within your business, and who you want to do it for. It’s pretty hard to subdue your enthusiasm when discussing your work passion with a friend, and you’ll end up with a ton of content for you to tweak, restructure and fiddle with to get your voice right within the context of your content. In fact, almost all of my writing projects with clients starts with me asking a few pointed questions that opens the floodgates.

Tell me, is your written voice a reflection of the real you?

Grammar and spelling not your thing? Takes you forever to bang out a 300 word article? Need to update your flyer or website but you get tangled in words? Gosh, don’t put yourself through that quagmire when there are people out there with Masters in this shiz- aka me.

This is a post in my Writing for Business blog series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems.  If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

The Blueprint - Monthly Newsletter

The Blueprint - Get gorgeous communications direct to your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Has your mailing list has lost that lovin’ feeling?

Digital marketing mailing list

So, your business has one hell of a mailing list, created and curated carefully over time through networking events, through opt ins, through beautifully designed and executed strategies.  Initially, you gave lots of thought and love to your list. You created an email communications strategy- aligned to your business’ broader communications strategic direction, of course- complete with timeline and a schedule of email campaigns that included what you intended to say to your list, what you wanted them to know about you, about your services. You were hellbent in your mission to provide useful, helpful content full of value-adds to give your list an insight into working with you, to share your knowledge, and dare I say it, inspire and engage. The first couple of months went well; you met your deadlines, your content went out to your list consistently and then… and then…  You skipped a scheduled mail out because you were busy with client work, or a project completely took over your work schedule. One deadline slipped, then another, and then another, and suddenly you realised you hadn’t sent anything to your list for yonkers. Now it just feels awkward, and you don’t know how to reconnect with your list, or how the recipients will react when you land back in their inbox.

You know what? The impact on your business when you neglect your mailing list isn’t great. Email marketing is a fantastic business communications tool because it’s a way to build relationships and connection, share an insight into working with you, or a way to keep front of mind. However, a neglected list is not a dead strategy- we can fix this situation and get back on track.

Step 1

Create a quick content plan to see you through three months, six months or even a year of monthly emails. Emails can be in the form of a newsletter, a letter from you, or a curated list of  your blog posts, special offers, behind-the-scenes information. Basically, have the content outlined as much as possible to make it easy for you to bang out email communications even when frantically busy. Keep the focus on getting reacquainted with your business, and adding value and benefits rather than lead generating- don’t ignore someone for six months and then hit them up for a sale!

Step 2

Reach out to your list with an email full of brand personality and a heartfelt apology for your absence. If appropriate, explain what you been up, what’s kept you from their inbox and reaffirm your commitment to regular communications with them.

Step 3

Meet your commitment! Send out emails to a schedule that you’ve promised in Step two, with content that you outlined in Step one. Easy peasy!

Want a bonus step? Think about doing a quick Facebook campaign, with some lives and some posts expressing your commitment to your mailing list, what subscribers can expect and maybe even an inexpensive ad campaign that targets your mailing list. You might get new subscribers who don’t want to miss out on your fabulous content, and your existing list will have a double touchpoint.

Tell me, does your mailing list need some love and attention?

This is a post in my Digital Marketing blog series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my social media and digital marketing bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock online communications and how to use digital marketing to solve your business marketing problems.  If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

The Blueprint - Monthly Newsletter

The Blueprint - Get gorgeous communications direct to your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Say what? Word of mouth is a communications force to be reckoned with

word of mouth marketing

 

Years ago, I interviewed a business owner for a profile piece who had built an extremely profitable business providing educational experiences to small children. She had built a significant client base without a marketing budget, before these heady days of social media. How? Purely and simply, word of mouth. Here’s the thing, and feel free to quote me: mums in the park are a force to be reckoned with.

Word of mouth marketing is incredibly powerful. It’s hardly new; people have shared their experiences with businesses, good and bad since Abraham played full-forward for Jerusalem (as my gorgeous dad would say), and it’s another form of social proof communications. It’s a concept that I use with my communications advising clients, including this beautiful business, to enhance and extract word of mouth to raise awareness and gain clients.

At it’s core, word of mouth marketing is basically getting people to do your marketing for you. It’s giving service that is so exemplary that people can’t help but sing your praises. As a communications concept, creating an environment to facilitate and enable word of mouth is key, one that is respectful, values-based and client or customer focused. It encourages loyalty, trust and engagement. It’s being clear on your client’s pain points and problems, and having a solution that addresses them, and addresses them in such a way that they feel compelled to share their experience with you with their friends and family with the same pain points.

 

Tell me, is word of mouth a consideration when you make the decision to work with someone?

 

This is a post in my Communications Toolkit series. Each month, I share insights, hints and tips from my communications and copywriting bag of tricks. I’ll show you how to rock copywriting a range of products, tactics to communications glory and how to use communications and PR to solve your business marketing problems. If there’s something specific you’d like to know, please shoot me an email or give me a buzz, and I’ll do my best to help, or address it in an upcoming blog post or on my social media platforms.

The Blueprint - Monthly Newsletter

The Blueprint - Get gorgeous communications direct to your inbox.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.